The Value of Philosophy – Bertrand Russell

The Value of Philosophy – Bertrand Russell

“practical” person
One who recognizes:
– immediate material needs; one that needs food for the body
– but is oblivious of the necessity of providing food for the mind; failing to meet one’s mental needs.
– Philosophy is inaccurate and uncertain of things
Philosophy
the identification, analysis, and
Why free ourselves from the “practical” person?
Philosophy’s aim
Knowledge, unlike the rigid forms of sciences, that examines our beliefs and convictions through trial and error, question after question.

The achievement of knowledge through criticism, “which gives unity and system to the body of science.”

Types of questions that philosophers deal with?
-Has the universe any unity of plan or purpose, or is it just a large open area of atoms floating around space?
– Are good and evil important to the universe or only to man?
– Is consciousness an accident or a permanent part of the universe in hopes of growing wisdom?
Chief value of philosophy lies…
in uncertainty.
– A man who has no interest in philosophy goes through life imprisoned from the opinions, beliefs, and predudices from the people around him.
– Although philosophy is unable to tell us with absolute certainty what are the true answers to the doubts, it is able to suggest many possibilities that can broaden our thoughts and free us from custom though.
Instinctive person
“Self”
Why study philosophy?
– Diminishing our feeling of certainty to what things are increases our knowledge and conception of what is possible and diminish the dogma in which closes the mind from any speculation.
– we cannot hope for definite answers or even high degrees of certainty.
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